WW 1 Aircraft

Fokker D-VII

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The Fokker D.VII was a German World War I fighter aircraft designed by Reinhold Platz of the Fokker-Flugzeugwerke. Germany produced around 3,300 D.VII aircraft in the second half of 1918. In service with the Luftstreitkräfte, the D.VII quickly proved itself to be a formidable aircraft. The Armistice ending the war specifically required Germany to surrender all D.VIIs to the Allies.[1] Surviving aircraft saw much service with many countries in the years after World War I.​  More...
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Wing Span : 36" -  914 mm
​Fuse Length : 660 mm
Motor : NTM 28x26 800kv
Propeller : 9x6
ESC : Turnigy 25 AMP Plush
Battery : 2S-3S Lipo
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de Havilland Tiger Moth

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
The de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth is a 1930s biplane designed by Geoffrey de Havilland and built by the de Havilland Aircraft Company. It was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) and many other operators as a primary trainer aircraft. In addition to the type's principal use for ab-initiotraining, the Second World War saw RAF Tiger Moth operating in other capacities, including maritime surveillance, defensive anti-invasion preparations, and even some aircraft that had been outfitted to function as armed light bombers.
The Tiger Moth remained in service with the RAF until it was succeeded and replaced by the de Havilland Chipmunk during the early 1950s. Many of the military surplus aircraft subsequently entered into civil operation. Many nations have used the Tiger Moth in both military and civil applications, and it remains in widespread use as a recreational aircraft in several different countries. It is still occasionally used as a primary training aircraft, particularly for those pilots wanting to gain experience before moving on to other tailwheel aircraft. Many Tiger Moths are now employed by various companies offering trial lesson experiences. The de Havilland Moth club, founded 1975, is now an owners' association offering a mutual club and technical support.  More...
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Wing Span : 36" -  914 mm
​Fuse Length : 667 mm
Motor : NTM 28x26 800kv
Propeller : 9x6
ESC : Turnigy 25 AMP Plush
Battery : 2S-3S Lipo
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Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
The Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 was a British biplane fighter aircraft of the First World War.
The first examples reached the Western Front before the Sopwith Camel. Although it had a much better overall performance than the Camel, problems with its Hispano-Suiza engine, particularly the geared-output H-S 8B-powered early versions, meant that there was a chronic shortage of S.E.5s until well into 1918 and fewer squadrons were equipped with the S.E.5 than with the Sopwith fighter. Together with the Camel, the S.E.5 was instrumental in regaining allied air superiority in mid-1917 and maintaining it for the rest of the war, ensuring there was no repetition of "Bloody April" 1917 when losses in the Royal Flying Corps were much heavier than in the Luftstreitkräfte.  More...
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Wing Span : 36" -  914 mm
​Fuse Length : 667 mm
Motor : NTM 28x30 800kv
Propeller : 9x6
ESC : Turnigy 30 AMP Plush
Battery : 2200 mah 3S Lipo
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