Classic Aircraft

Crosby CR-4

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
The Crosby CR-4 is the follow-on of the Menasco C6S-4 powered Crosby CR-3 (a.k.a. C6R-3) designed to be powered by a twelve cylinder Ranger V-770 engine[1] The aircraft was designed while Crosby was recovering with a broken back and fractured skull from the 1936 crash of his all metal CR-3. Despite a prior failure causing a crash, money shortages prompted Crosby to reuse the Menasco C6S-4 engine from his former racer. Funding for construction came from fellow racer Kieth Rider. Students from the Curtiss-Wright Technical Institute in Glendale, California assembled the aircraft.[2]
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Wing Span : 40" - 1020 mm​
Motor Option 1 : Turnigy 2836/8 1100 Kv
Motor Option 2 :  DYS 1500KV 2-4S Brushless Motor
Battery :  2200 mah 3S Lipo
Servo Option 1 : Turnigy THX 900 9g
Servo Option 2 : 4X MR.RC SG90 9g Mini Servo

$1.00 USD
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De Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk

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The de Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk is a tandem, two-seat, single-engined primary trainer aircraftwhich was the standard primary trainer for the Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Air Force and several other air forces through much of the post-Second World War years. The de Havilland Chipmunk was the firstpostwar aviation project of de Havilland Canada. Today, over 500 DHC-1 Chipmunk airframes remain airworthy with more being rebuilt every year.
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Wing Span : 1020 mm
Fuse Length : 665 mm
Motor : NTM 28x30 1200kv / 400w
Propeller : 8x6
Battery : 2200 mah 3S Lipo
$1.00 USD
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DeHavilland DH-88

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
The MacRobertson International Air Race, a race between England and Melbourne to be held in October 1934 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the State of Victoria, was announced in 1933.[1][2][3]Despite previous British air racing successes, culminating in 1931 in the outright winning of theSchneider Trophy, there was no British aeroplane capable of putting up a challenge over the MacRobertson course with its long overland stages. In January 1934 the de Havilland company offered to design a 200-mile-per-hour (320 km/h) aircraft to compete in the race and produce a limited number if three were ordered by February 1934. The sale price was to be £5,000 each (approximately £320,000 in 2016, when adjusted for inflation). This would by no means cover the aircraft's development costs.[2][4] More...
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Wing Span : 1220 mm
Fuse Length : 915 mm
Motor : 2 x NTM 28x26 1200 Kv
Propeller :  1 X APC 8 x 6 CW , 1 X APC 8 x 6 CCW
Retracts : 2 x  Servoless Retracts
Battery : 2200 mah 3S Lipo
$2.00 USD
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Spacewalker

 
The Warner Revolution I, also marketed as the Space Walker I, is an American homebuilt aircraft that was designed and produced by Warner Aerocraft of Seminole, Florida. When it was available the aircraft was supplied as a kit or in the form of plans for amateur construction.[1] The aircraft is intended to be reminiscent of the open cockpit monoplanes of the 1930s, such as the Ryan ST.[1] More...
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Wing Span : 1015 mm
Fuse Length : 665 mm
Motor : NTM 28x30 28-26 1200kv / 285w
Propeller : 8x6
Battery : 1500 mah 3S Lipo
$1.00 USD
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Lockheed Electra 12A

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The Lockheed Model 12 Electra Junior, more commonly known as the Lockheed 12 or L-12, is an eight-seat, six-passenger all-metal twin-engine transport aircraft of the late 1930s designed for use by small airlines, companies, and wealthy private individuals. A scaled-down version of the Lockheed Model 10 Electra, the Lockheed 12 was not popular as an airliner but was widely used as a corporate and government transport. Several were also used for testing new aviation technologies.  More...
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Wing Span : 1220 mm
Fuse Length : 915 mm
Motor : 2 x NTM 28x26 1000kv  - 1200 Kv
Propeller : 1 X APC 8 x 6 CW, 1 X APC 8 x 6 CCW
Retracts : 2 x  Servoless Retracts
Battery : 2200 mah 3S Lipo
$2.00 USD
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Beechcraft Model 18

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Beechcraft Model 18 (or "Twin Beech", as it is also known) is a six to 11-seat,[2] twin-engined, low-wing, tailwheel light aircraft manufactured by the Beech Aircraft Corporation of Wichita, Kansas. Continuously produced from 1937 to November 1969, (over 32 years, the world record at the time), over 9,000 were produced, making it one of the world's most widely used light aircraft. Sold worldwide as a civilian executive, utility, cargo aircraft, and passenger airliner on tailwheels, nosewheels, skis or floats, it was also used as a military aircraft.  More...
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Wing Span : 1220 mm
Fuse Length : 915 mm
Motor : 2 x NTM 28x26 1000kv  - 1200 Kv
Propeller : 1 X APC 8 x 6 CW, 1 X APC 8 x 6 CCW
Retracts : 2 x  Servoless Retracts
Battery : 2200 mah 3S Lipo
$2.00 USD
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